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Things to do for fun in Southland in winter with kids

July 4, 2010
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Another bleak grey weekend in Invercargill, all with colds. What to do? Make a sled in the garage out of old skis and then, find snow. So we headed to Mavora Lakes (for those of you not in the know, this area is one of Southland’s best kept secrets) where we didn’t find as much snow as expected.

We ate lunch, played by the lake and then the sandflies forced us to resume our quest for snow. We drove a little further and found a flat snowy spot, perfect for testing the sled. It worked well, though we didn’t find a big enough hill to really see how it would go.

Further on, we stopped at the Oreti River and I took some photos (check out my flickr account, the link is on sidebar, for more). The river is narrow and fairly shallow now and it looks clear and pristine, compared to the lower reaches, although that means looking away from the didymo slime covered rocks.

We spotted two large trout (see if you can spot them – the two shadows in the middle but rocks on either side), and it is obvious why this is a meca for anglers.

I saw the Thomson Mountains as we approached Mavora Lakes -this is the source of the Oreti River, although I was on the wrong side from where the Oreti water comes  from. It would take a long tramp indeed to get  to the source.

We also stopped at Three Kings, a focal point of the Oreti River with three large rocks towering out of the river, which the water almost seems to make a strange detour around. The flats by the Three Kings river are still grazed by cattle but I think further up at the bridge we stopped (the beginnings of Mckellers Flat) we were in a high country station area, and almost at the margins of farming.

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. July 5, 2010 1:29 am

    stunning pictures. 🙂 was there didymo even at the source? 😦

  2. July 5, 2010 2:47 am

    Cheers. I didn’t make it right to the source -that was further up in the mountains -maybe 5 or 10km more (will have to check map). Apparently the didymo doesn’t travel upstream by itself – it is only as far as the anglers have introduced it. It is pretty obvious when you see it -blobby, slimy stuff on rocks on an otherwise clear stream.

    Still aiming to get some water samples to you soon!

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